By Georg Seitz - Düsseldorfer Auktionshaus, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17432425
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7 Reasons Why Raising Rabbits is Great for Survival Preppers

7 Reasons Why Raising Rabbits is Great for Survival Preppers

By Georg Seitz - Düsseldorfer Auktionshaus, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17432425
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Here are 7 Compelling Reasons to Master the Art of Raising Rabbits for Homesteading. Raising rabbits for survival prepping will give you many benefits, making them a popular choice among preppers and survivalists. This is the follow-up to Homesteading: A Path to Self-Sufficiency and Sustainable Living. Raising Chickens

1 – Breed. Breed. Breed for Survival!

Rabbits breed a lot, and they have a quick reproductive cycle. Baby rabbits, known as “kits” are born about 30 days after they have been bred. Rabbits are very fertile. Maintain this breeding program, and you will have lots of kits born.

We got two rabbits when I was 13-14 years old, and they quickly grew to 25 rabbits in no time! That meant at a young age, I had to learn how to butcher rabbits for our eating. I was able to keep two of the rabbits out of all that was born. I kept a female I named “Minesy” who was very big and light brown. The other rabbit was a male I named “Bugsy,” a big grey rabbit who looked like Bugs Bunny.

This looks like "Minesy", the big female I had.By William Warby - https://www.flickr.com/photos/wwarby/4011378891, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=116697082
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This looks like “Minesy”, the big female I had.
Image by William Warby – CC BY 2.0

I let them in our house (the log cabin) one day when my mom was gone doing grocery shopping. Can you guess what happened? There were rabbit pellets (their poop) everywhere! It took months to find all of the places under things where they went and pooped. Needless to say, my mom was really upset, and I didn’t do that again, lol.

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This is what rabbit poop looks like. It was everywhere in our house, like behind furniture! My mom found it for months. It looks like rabbit pelleted feed.

2 – Rabbits are Known for Their Efficient Feed-to-meat Conversion Rate

They can convert feed, such as pellets, grass, and weeds, into muscle mass more efficiently than other livestock animals like chickens.

This means you can produce a significant amount of meat with fewer resources, making them a cost-effective option for survival prepping. Besides, I like rabbit meat better than chicken. And I’m not much of an egg eater.

3 – Rabbits are Small and Quiet

They are well-suited for small-scale and urban prepping due to their compact size and minimal space requirements. They can be raised in small hutches or cages, making them suitable for individuals with limited land or urban dwellers.

We built our bunny hutch. It was up on wooden stilts with a roof made of aluminum, wooden supports, and slats. The bottom and sides were made out of chicken wire.

You won’t even hear squeaking. Rabbits are very quiet, which is good for people who live in a noise-control area.

4 – Rabbits are Relatively Low-maintenance Animals

Compared to larger livestock, rabbits require less space, feed, and maintenance efforts. This makes them great for people new to animal husbandry or with limited time and resources.

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An American Chinchilla rabbit. This is what my “Bugsy” looked like.
by Carl HeuerCC BY-SA 3.0

5 – Rabbit Meat is Lean, Nutritious, and Easily Digestible

From a young age, when I was dressing them for eating, they have been one of my favorite meats. It provides a high-quality protein source that can complement other food supplies in a survival situation. Rabbit meat is also versatile and can be cooked in various ways.

6 – Rabbits are Dual-purpose Animals, Good for Survival Prepping

Apart from their meat, rabbits also produce valuable byproducts. Their fur can be used for various purposes, including clothing and crafts. Rabbit manure is an excellent organic fertilizer for gardens.

7 – Rabbits are not Disease Carriers

Unlike other livestock, rabbits are not known carriers of zoonotic diseases that can infect humans. This reduces the risk of disease transmission, making rabbits a safer choice for small-scale and backyard farming.

In conclusion, it’s important to note that raising rabbits for survival prepping also requires knowledge and skills in their care, breeding, and butchering. Proper housing, nutrition, and health management are essential for their well-being and productivity. It’s advisable to conduct further research, consult experienced rabbit breeders or homesteaders, and consider specific factors such as local regulations, available resources, and personal circumstances before incorporating rabbits into your survival prepper plans.

A good resource for US regulations, how to handle, and how to raise rabbits, see Rabbit From Farm to Table

Rabbit Production in Florida – https://mysrf.org/pdf/pdf_rabbit/r14.pdf

American Rabbits https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_rabbit

Related: Homesteading: A Path to Self-Sufficiency and Sustainable Living. Raising Chickens

I hope you enjoyed this article. Thank you for reading. Let me know in the comments if you have any questions, and I will be more than happy to help you out.

Teri

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